readthelabelPlease read the pesticide label prior to use. The information contained at this web site is not a substitute for a pesticide label. Trade names used herein are for convenience only. No endorsement of products is intended, nor is criticism of unnamed products implied.


Learning Objectives

After you finish studying this unit, you should be able to:

  • Interpret the terms "label" and "labeling."
  • Identify the meaning of "Restricted Use" classification and explain where to look for it on pesticide labeling.
  • Distinguish among the terms "common name," "chemical name," and "brand name" and know which most accurately identifies a pesticide product.
  • Interpret the signal words (and symbols) on pesticide labeling.
  • Know the types of hazard precautionary statements on pesticide labeling.
  • Interpret the statement: "It is a violation of Federal law to use this product in a manner inconsistent with its labeling."
  • Explain the pesticide user's responsibility to follow use directions and requirements contained in separate documents which, although referenced on the labeling, do not necessarily accompany the product at the time of purchase.

Pesticide product labeling is the main method of communication between a pesticide manufacturer and pesticide users. The information printed on or attached to the pesticide container is the label. Labeling includes the label plus all other information you receive from the manufacturer about the product when you buy it. The labeling may include brochures, leaflets, and other information that accompanies the pesticide product. Pesticide labeling gives you instructions on how to use the product safely and correctly. Pesticide users are required by law to comply with all the instructions and directions for use in pesticide labeling.

EPA Approval of Pesticide Labeling

No pesticide, or any product that claims to be a pesticide, may be sold in the United States until the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has reviewed the manufacturer's application for registration and determined the use of the product will not present an unreasonable risk to humans or the environment. As part of this product registration process, EPA has certain labeling information requirements and must approve all language the manufacturer proposes to include in the product labeling.

The EPA reviews the labeling to make sure that it contains all the information needed for safe and effective use of the pesticide product and the information is backed up by data submitted (or cited) by the manufacturer. The EPA may require the manufacturer to change the labeling if it does not contain enough information or if the information is wrong. The EPA may also require the labeling include other information about laws or regulations adopted to protect humans or the environment.

Only after the EPA has reviewed the labeling and registered the product can a pesticide product be sold. If the manufacturer wants to change the information in the labeling after the product and labeling are registered, the EPA must approve the change.The EPA also may require changes in labeling.

Types of Registration

You are responsible for applying only registered pesticides. You may encounter three major types of registration:

  • Federal registration
  • Special local needs registration (SLN or Section 24)
  • Emergency exemptions from registration (Section 18)

Federal EPA registrations are the most common. Most pesticide uses are registered this way. Look for the official EPA registration number (which must appear on the label) to be sure you are buying an approved product.

Special local needs registrations (known as SLN or 24(c) registrations) allow states to further control how the pesticide is used in their jurisdiction, including registering additional uses or adding limitations for a federally registered pesticide. These registrations often involve adding application sites, pests, or alternate control techniques to those listed on the federally registered labeling.

Supplemental labeling must be provided for each SLN registration. Applicators must have a copy of the SLN labeling in their possession in order to apply the pesticide for that purpose. The registration number of SLN labeling will include the initials "SLN" and the standard two-letter abbreviation code for the state that issued the registration. These registrations are legal only in the state or local area specified in the labeling. Any application in another state or region is subject to civil and criminal penalties. 

Emergency exemptions from registration are used when an emergency pest situation arises for which no pesticide is registered. If both federal and SLN registrations would take too long to enact, an emergency registration can be used. Known as "Section 18 exemptions", these registrations are handled by the highest governing official involved -- usually a state governor or federal agency head. This provision allows a pesticide product to be sold and used for a nonregistered purpose for a specified period of time. Strict controls and recordkeeping are required for all these emergency uses. You must understand all of the special requirements and responsibilities involved whenever you use pesticides with emergency exemptions. The agency that has granted the emergency exemption will provide application rates, safety precautions, and other vital information.

Both SLN and Section 18 registrations that pertain to Montana can be found at the Montana Department of Agriculture website.

Classification of Pesticide Uses

A succession of federal laws has addressed pesticides and their use in the United States. The Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) is the main law that addresses pesticides and pesticide use. This law was first approved in 1947 and has undergone several revisions. FIFRA, the Montana Pesticide Act and Administrative Rules of Montana (ARM) are the principal statutes governing pesticide use in Montana. 

FIFRA requires pesticide manufacturers to register each of their products with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency either as a general use (GUP) or restricted use (RUP) pesticides with the exception of a few minimum-risk active ingredients. In some cases, a pesticide's active ingredient may be registered for both general and restricted use.

Restricted-Use Pesticides (RUP)

A pesticide, or some of its uses, is classified as restricted if it could cause harm to humans (pesticide handlers or other persons) or to the environment unless it is applied by certified applicators who have the knowledge to use these pesticides safely and effectively. The word "use" in this phrase is a general term -- it refers to such activities as:

  • application
  • mixing and loading
  • transporting, storing, or handling pesticides after the manufacturer's seal is broken
  • care and maintenance of application and handling equipment
  • disposal of pesticides and their containers

RUPs can be used only by certified applicators (or noncertified individuals working under the direct supervision of a certified applicator). In most cases, anyone can use general use pesticides (GUP) according to the label without being certified. 

FIFRA also defines two categories of certified applicators: private applicators and commercial applicators.

Certified Pesticide Applicators

Only a certified pesticide applicator may use or supervise the use of restricted-use pesticides. Under federal law, there are two types of certified pesticide applicators -- private applicators and commercial applicators.

Private applicators use or supervise the use of restricted-use pesticides to produce an agricultural commodity on property owned or rented by themselves or their employer, or on the property of another person with whom they trade services.

Commercial applicators use or supervise the use of restricted-use pesticides on any property or for any purpose other than that listed for private applicators.

Certification requires training or testing for competency in the safe and effective handling and use of restricted-use pesticides. Your state, tribal, or federal agency will conduct training and/or testing for certification and may impose stricter standards than those required by federal law. Many such agencies have agreements to allow certification by one to be accepted by others nearby.

Parts of Pesticide Labelingglypro-label

The information on pesticide labeling usually is grouped under headings to make it easier to find the information you need. Some information is required by law to appear on a certain part of the labeling or under certain headings. Other information may be placed wherever the manufacturer chooses.

Identifying Information

Pesticide labeling contains basic information which helps users clearly identify the product. Some of these items will be on the front panel of every label according to EPA requirements. Other items, while generally on the front panel, may be located elsewhere on the label or in the labeling if the manufacturer chooses.

Brand name

Each manufacturer has a brand or trade name for each product. Different manufacturers may use different brand names for the same pesticide active ingredient. For example, the herbicides Ally and Escort™ have the same active ingredient (a.i.), metsulfuron-methyl. However, one is labeled for cropland and one is labeled for rangeland/noncrop areas. Most companies register each brand name as a trademark and do not allow any other company to use that name. The brand or trade name is the one used in advertisements and by company salespeople. The brand name shows up plainly on the front panel of the label.

Pesticide handlers must beware of choosing a pesticide product by brand name alone. Many companies use the same basic name with only minor variations to designate entirely different pesticide chemicals. For example:

Hopperstopper™ = carbaryl

Hopperstopper Super™ = parathion and methomyl

Hopperstopper Supreme™ = carbaryl, parathion, and methomyl

Sometimes several companies will sell the same pesticide product under different brand names. For example:

De Weed 2E = diquat 2 lbs. per gallon EC formulated by Company X

NoWeeds = diquat 2 lbs. per gallon EC formulated by Company Z.

Always read the ingredient statement to determine the active ingredients in a product.

Ingredient statement 

Each pesticide label must list what is in the product. The list is written so you can readily see what the active ingredients are and the amount of each ingredient (as a percentage of the total product). The ingredient statement must list the official chemical name and/or common name for each active ingredient. Inert ingredients need not be named, but the label must show what percent of the total contents they make up. 

Because pesticides have complex chemical names, many are given a shorter common name. Only common names that are officially accepted by the EPA may be used in the ingredient statement on the pesticide label. The official common name may be followed by the chemical name in the list of active ingredients. For example, The label with the brand or trade name Glypro™ contains glyphosate, a common name for the chemical name N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine, isopropylamine salt.

By purchasing pesticides according to the common or chemical names, you will always be sure to get the right active ingredient.

Registration and establishment numbers

The pesticide handler needs these numbers in case of poisoning, claims of misuse, or liability claims.

An EPA registration number (for example, EPA Reg. No. 62719-324) indicates that the pesticide label has been approved by EPA. Most products will contain only two sets of numbers; for example, EPA Reg. No. 62719-324. The first set of numbers, 62719, identifies the manufacturer or company. The second set, 324, identifies the product.

Additional letters and numbers are sometimes part of the EPA registration number; for example, EPA Reg. No. 3120-280-AA-0850. The letters AA might be required by a particular state to appear on that label. The 0850 is the distributor's identification number and appears on labels of distributor products.

When a pesticide is registered by a state because of a special local need, the registration is designated, for example, as EPA SLN No. MT-91-0006. In this case, SLN indicates "special local need" and MT means that the product is registered for use in Montana. If the SLN registration is for only a few of the registered uses in the pesticide labeling, the SLN number may not be on the front panel of the pesticide label. Instead, it may be located in the supplementary labeling for the use to which it applies.

The establishment number (for example, EPA Est. No. 2217-KS-1) appears on either the pesticide label or container. It identifies the facility where the product was made in case there are questions or concerns about the pesticide product, the facility that made the product can be determined.

Name and address of manufacturer -- The law requires the maker or distributor of a product to put the name and address of the company on the label. This is so you will know who made or sold the product and it may not be noted on the front panel.

Net contents 

The front panel of the pesticide label tells you how much is in the container. This can be expressed as pounds or ounces for dry formulations and as gallons, quarts, pints, or fluid ounces for liquids. Liquid formulations also may list the pounds of active ingredient per gallon of product.

Type of pesticide

The type of pesticide usually is listed on the front panel of the label. This short statement indicates in general terms what the product will control. For example:

"Insecticide for control of certain insects on fruits, nuts, and ornamentals"

"Algicide"

"Herbicide for the control of trees, brush, and weeds"

Type of formulation

The front panel of some pesticide labels may or may not tell you what kind of formulation the product is. The formulation may be named or the label may show only an abbreviation, such as WP for wettable powder, D for dust, or EC for emulsifiable concentrate.

tordon-labelRestricted-Use Designation

When a pesticide is classified as restricted, the label will state "Restricted Use Pesticide" in a box at the top of the front panel. Below this heading may be a statement describing the reason for the restricted-use classification. Usually another statement will describe the category of certified applicator who can buy and use the product. Unclassified pesticides have no designation on the product label. Examples of restricted-use statements on pesticide labels include:

"RESTRICTED USE PESTICIDE due to acute toxicity and toxicity to birds and mammals. For retail sale and use only by certified applicators or persons under their direct supervision and only for those uses covered by the certified applicator's certification."

"RESTRICTED USE PESTICIDE due to very high acute toxicity to humans and birds. For retail sale to and use only by certified applicators or persons under their direct supervision and only for those uses covered by the certified applicator's certification. Direct supervision for this product is defined as the certified applicator being physically present during application, mixing, loading, repair, and cleaning of application equipment. Commercial certified applicators must also ensure that all persons involved in these activities are informed of the precautionary statements."

"RESTRICTED USE PESTICIDE due to oncogenicity (tending to cause or give rise to tumors.) For retail sale and use only by certified applicators or persons under their direct supervision and only for those uses covered by the certified applicator's certification. The use of this product may be hazardous to your health. This product contains [active ingredient], which has been determined to cause tumors in laboratory animals."

"RESTRICTED USE PESTICIDE due to ground water concern. For retail sale to and use only by certified applicators or persons under their direct supervision and only for those uses covered by the certified applicators' certification. Users must read and follow all precautionary statements and instructions for use in order to minimize potential of [active ingredient] to reach ground water."

Front-Panel Precautionary Statementsboa-label

Signal words and symbols

The signal words -- DANGER, WARNING, or CAUTION -- must appear in large letters on the front panel of the pesticide label. It indicates how acutely toxic the product is to humans. The signal word is immediately below the statement, "Keep out of reach of children," which also must appear on every label.

The signal word is based not on the active ingredient (a.i.) alone, but on the contents of the formulated product. It reflects the hazard of any active ingredients, carriers, solvents, or inert ingredients. The signal word indicates the risk of acute (immediate) effects from the four routes of exposure to a pesticide product (oral, dermal, inhalation, and eye) and is based on the one that is greatest. The signal word does not indicate the risk of chronic (delayed) effects or allergic effects.

Use the signal word to help you decide what precautionary measures are needed for you, your workers, and other persons (or animals) who may be exposed.

  • DANGER - This word signals you that the pesticide is highly toxic. The product is very likely to cause acute illness from oral, dermal, or inhalation exposure, or to cause severe eye or skin irritation.
  • POISON/SKULL AND CROSSBONES - All highly toxic pesticides that are likely to cause acute illness through oral, dermal, or inhalation exposure also will carry the word POISON printed in red and the skull and crossbones symbol. Products that have the signal word DANGER due to skin and eye irritation potential will not carry the word POISON or the skull and crossbones symbol.
  • WARNING - This word signals you that the product is moderately likely to cause acute illness from oral, dermal, or inhalation exposure or that the product is likely to cause moderate skin or eye irritation.
  • CAUTION - This word signals you that the product is slightly toxic or relatively nontoxic. The product has only slight potential to cause acute illness from oral, dermal, or inhalation exposure. The skin or eye irritation it would cause, if any, is likely to be slight.

Statement of practical treatment (first aid)

Most pesticide products are required to include instructions on how to respond to an emergency exposure involving that product. The instructions usually include first aid measures and may include instructions to seek medical help. If the Statement of Practical Treatment is not located on the front panel, a statement on the front panel must refer the user to the section of the label or labeling where the Statement of Practical Treatment may be found.

Hazards to Humans and Domestic Animals

Acute effects statements

The label or labeling will contain statements that indicate which route of entry (mouth, skin, eyes, and lungs) you must particularly protect and what specific action you need to take to avoid acute effects from pesticide exposure. These statements may be on the front or side panel of the label, or they may be somewhere else in the labeling. The statements will warn you if you may be harmed by swallowing or inhaling the product or getting it on your skin or in your eyes.

Many pesticides can cause acute effects by more than one route, so study these statements carefully. These precautionary statements tell you what parts of your body will need the most protection. "DANGER: Fatal if swallowed or inhaled" gives a far different indication than "DANGER: Corrosive -- causes eye damage and severe skin burns."

Delayed effects statements

The labeling of pesticides that the EPA considers to have the potential to cause delayed effects must warn you of that fact. These statements will tell you whether the product has been shown to cause problems such as tumors or reproductive problems in laboratory animals.

Allergic effects statement

If tests or other data indicate that the pesticide product has the potential to cause allergic effects, such as skin irritation or asthma, the product labeling must state that fact. Sometimes the labeling refers to allergic effects as "sensitization."

Personal protective equipment (PPE) statements

Immediately following the statements about acute, delayed, and allergic effects, the labeling usually lists personal protective equipment requirements. These statements tell you the minimum personal protective equipment that you must wear when using the pesticide. Sometimes the statements will require different personal protective equipment for different pesticide handling activities. For example, an apron may be required only during mixing, loading or equipment cleaning. Sometimes the statements will allow reduced personal protective equipment when you use safety systems, such as closed systems or enclosed cabs.

 Environmental Hazards

This section of the pesticide labeling will indicate precautions for protecting the environment when you use the pesticide. Some general statements appear on the labeling of nearly every pesticide. Most pesticide labeling, for example, will warn you not to contaminate water when you apply the pesticide or when you clean your equipment or dispose of pesticide wastes. The labeling will contain specific precautionary statements if the pesticide poses a specific hazard to the environment. For example, it may warn you that the product is highly toxic to bees or other wildlife.

Physical or Chemical Hazards

This section of the pesticide labeling will tell you of any special fire, explosion, or chemical hazards the product may pose. For example, it will alert you if the product is so flammable that you need to be especially careful to keep it away from heat or open flame or if it is so corrosive that it must be stored in a corrosion-resistant container. When pesticides are flammable, smoking while handling them is extremely hazardous.

NOTE: The physical or chemical hazard statements are not located in the same place in all pesticide labeling. Some labeling groups them in a box under the heading "Physical or Chemical Hazards." Other labeling may list them on the front panel of the label beneath the signal word. Still other labeling may list the hazards in paragraph form under headings such as "Note" or "Important." If there are no unusual physical or chemical hazards, there may be no statement in the labeling.

Directions for Use

Directly under the heading "Directions for Use" on every pesticide product labeling is the following statement: "It is a violation of Federal Law to use this product in a manner inconsistent with its labeling." The Directions for Use section also contains sections on storage and disposal and may contain a section on entry into treated areas after a pesticide application. In addition, the Directions for Use section will contain specific directions for product use.

Use inconsistent with the labeling

It is illegal to use a pesticide in any way not permitted by the labeling. A pesticide may be used only on the plants, animals, or sites named in the Directions for Use. You may not use higher dosages, higher concentrations, or more frequent applications. You must follow all directions for use, including directions concerning safety, mixing, diluting, storage, and disposal. You must wear the specified personal protective equipment even though you may be risking only your own safety by not wearing it. The use directions and instructions are not advice, they are requirements.

Federal law does allow you to use pesticides in some ways not specifically mentioned in the labeling. Unless you would be in violation of the laws of your state or tribe, you may:

    • Apply a pesticide at any dosage, concentration, or frequency less than that listed on the labeling
    • Apply a pesticide against any target pest not listed on the labeling if the application is to a plant, animal, or site that is listed
    • Use any appropriate equipment or method of application that is not prohibited by the labeling
    • Mix a pesticide or pesticides with a fertilizer if the mixture is not prohibited by the labeling
    • Mix two or more pesticides, if all of the dosages are at or below the recommended rate

Entry statement

Some pesticide labeling contains a precaution about entering a treated area after application. This statement tells you how much time must pass before people can enter a treated area except under special circumstances. These entry intervals are set by both the EPA and some states. Entry intervals set by states are not always listed on the label; it is your responsibility to determine whether one has been set.

The entry statement may be printed in a box under the heading "Entry" or "Worker Protections," or it may be in a section with a title such as "Important," "Note," or "General Information." If the entry interval applies only to certain uses or locations, the heading may indicate that limitation. For example, the heading might be "Agricultural Use Restrictions."

Storage and disposal

All pesticide labeling contains some instructions for storing the pesticide. These may include both general statements, such as "Keep out of reach of children and pets," and specific directions, such as "Do not store in temperatures below 32oF."

Pesticide labeling also contains some general information about how to dispose of excess pesticide and the pesticide container in ways that are acceptable under federal regulations. State and local laws vary, however, so the labeling usually does not give exact disposal instructions.

Storage and disposal statements usually appear in a special section of the labeling titled "Storage and Disposal."

Other directions for use

The instructions on how to use the pesticide are an important part of the labeling. This is the best way you can find out the right way to handle the product.

The use instructions will tell you:

  • the pests that the manufacturer claims the product will control,
  • The plant, animal, or site the product is intended to protect
  • In what form the product should be applied
  • The correct equipment to use
  • How much pesticide to use
  • Mixing directions
  • Whether the product can be mixed with other often-used products
  • Whether the product is likely to cause unwanted injuries or stains to plants, animals, or surfaces
  • Where the material should be applied, and
  • When and how often it should be applied.

Directions for use by reference

Some directions for use that pesticide users must obey are contained in documents that are only referred to on the product labeling. Such instructions include EPA or other government agency regulations or requirements concerning the safe use of the pesticide product. For example, a pesticide label might state:

"Use of this product in a manner inconsistent with the PESTICIDE USE BULLETIN FOR PROTECTION OF ENDANGERED SPECIES is a violation of Federal laws. Restrictions for the protection of endangered species apply to this product. If restrictions apply to the area in which this product is to be used, you must obtain the PESTICIDE USE BULLETIN FOR PROTECTION OF ENDANGERED SPECIES for that county."

This statement probably would be the only indication on the pesticide label or in the labeling that other use directions and restrictions apply to the product.

You are responsible for determining whether the regulation, bulletin, or other document referred to on the pesticide product labeling applies to your situation and your intended use of the pesticide product. If the document is applicable, you must comply with all the specific directions for use and other requirements that it contains. These documents do not always accompany the pesticide product when it is sold. Instead, you may have to get the additional directions and requirements from other sources, such as pesticide dealers or company representatives, industry or commodity organizations, land-grant universities, or Cooperative Extension educators.

This reference to other documents is a new practice. It is necessary because there is no longer room on the traditional pesticide label to explain the requirements of all laws and regulations that may apply to the user. For example, EPA has adopted or is considering new requirements concerning:

  • Ground water protection
  • Endangered species protection
  • Pesticide transportation, storage, and disposal
  • Worker protection

Some of these are general use directions that apply to all pesticides, so one copy should be sufficient for each affected user. In other cases, the instructions and restrictions apply only in certain geographical areas or to certain uses of a pesticide product. Directions for use applicable in these specific situations need to be distributed only to the affected users.

The EPA decision not to require all applicable directions for use to be distributed with each pesticide product places greater responsibility on the pesticide user. One sentence or paragraph on a pesticide label may be the only notice you will receive that additional use directions are required in order for the product to be used in compliance with its labeling. You must:

  • determine whether you are affected,
  • locate the applicable directions for use,
  • determine how to comply with the instructions and requirements in the directions for use, and
  • comply with those instructions and requirements.

Know the Law

A law passed by Congress in 1947 and substantially amended in 1972, 1975, 1978, and 1988 regulates the registration, manufacture, sale, transportation, and use of pesticides. The Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act is commonly referred to by its initials -- FIFRA.

Major Provisions of FIFRA

FIFRA affects certified applicators in many ways. For example, it provides that:

  • EPA must register pesticides and pesticide uses.
  • All pesticides must be used only as directed on the labeling.
  • EPA must classify as "restricted use" those pesticide uses that may cause unreasonable adverse effects to the environment, including humans, even when used as directed on the product labeling.
  • Persons who buy or use restricted-use pesticides must be certified as competent pesticide applicators or must be directly supervised by a certified applicator.
  • States may establish stricter standards governing pesticides, but not more permissive standards.
  • Persons who use pesticides in a way that is "inconsistent with the pesticide labeling" are subject to penalties.

Penalties under FIFRA

If you violate FIFRA, or regulations issued under it, you are subject to civil penalties. They can be as much as $5,000 for each offense ($1,000 for private applicators). Before EPA can fine you, you have the right to ask for a hearing in your city or county. Some violations of the law also may subject you to criminal penalties. These can be as much as $25,000 or one year in prison, or both, for commercial applicators; $1,000 and/or 30 days in prison for private applicators. States may establish higher penalties.

Test Your Knowledge

Q. Explain the differences between the terms "label" and "labeling."

A. The label is the information printed on or attached to the pesticide container. Labeling includes the label, plus all other product information received from the manufacturer when you buy it.

Q. What do the words "Restricted Use Pesticide" tell you about the pesticide product?

A. "Restricted Use Pesticide" means that the product has been shown to be likely to harm people or the environment if it is not used correctly. It may be purchased and used only by certified applicators and those under their direct supervision.

Q. Where would you look to find out whether a pesticide is classified as Restricted Use?

A. If a pesticide is classified as Restricted Use, the words "Restricted Use Pesticide" will appear in a box on the front panel of the pesticide label.

Q. Explain the differences between chemical name, common name, and brand name. Which of these terms should you use to most accurately identify a pesticide product?

A. The chemical name is a complex name that identifies the chemical components and structure of the pesticide. A common name is a shorter name that EPA recognizes as a substitute for the chemical name of a product. A brand name is the name -- usually a trademark -- used by a chemical company to identify a pesticide product. The common name (or the chemical name, if no common name is given) is the most accurate and useful way to identify a pesticide product.

Q. Name and explain the meaning of the signal words and symbols you may see on a pesticide product.

A. "Caution" indicates that the pesticide product is slightly toxic or relatively nontoxic. "Warning" indicates that the pesticide product is moderately toxic. "Danger" indicates that the pesticide product is highly toxic. "Poison" and the skull and crossbones [symbol here] indicates that the pesticide product is highly toxic as a poison, rather than as a skin or eye irritant.

Q. Can you use the signal word on a pesticide label to judge the likelihood of suffering acute, delayed, or allergic effects if you are overexposed to the product? Explain.

A. Signal words and symbols indicate the likelihood that you will experience acute harmful effects if you are over-exposed. Signal words do not tell you anything about the risks of delayed harmful effects or allergic effects.

Q. What types of hazard statements should you look for in the pesticide labeling?

A. You should look for precautions about hazards to humans (and domestic animals), environmental hazards, and physical/chemical hazards.

Q. What types of precautionary statements may be included in the labeling section titled "Hazards to Humans"?

A. Acute effects precautions, delayed effects precautions, allergic effect precautions, and personal protective equipment requirements may be in the section of the labeling titled "Hazards to Humans."

Q. What is the meaning of the statement: "It is a violation of Federal law to use this product in a manner inconsistent with its labeling"?

A. It is illegal to use a pesticide in any way not permitted by the labeling. A pesticide may be used only on the plants, animals, or sites named in the directions for use. You may not use higher dosages, higher concentrations, or more frequent applications. You must follow all directions for use, including directions concerning safety, mixing, diluting, storage, and disposal. You must wear the specified personal protective equipment even though you may be risking only your own safety by not wearing it.

Q. Does the pesticide label contain all the instructions and directions for use that you need to use the product safely and legally?

A. Some pesticide products have all the necessary instructions and directions for use on the product label. For other products, more instructions and directions may be in other labeling that accompanies the product at the time of purchase. The label or labeling of still other products may refer to separate documents that contain specialized instructions and directions. Pesticide users are required by law to comply with all these types of instructions and directions -- not just with the label itself.